Norfolk Southern Northern Delaware Operations

The operations of Norfolk Southern in northern Delaware are constantly evolving. NS has primary yards at Newark and Edgemoor, as well as terminals at Reybold and the Port of Wilmington where switching activity is performed. There are road freights, unit trains, locals, Amtrak and SEPTA trains all sharing time and space in this area. To see a map of this area, click here.

NS maintains trackage rights over every mile of Amtrak's Northeast Corridor in Delaware. On the southern end of those rights, road trains utilize the NEC between Perryville, Md, and Newark, De, to access the Delmarva Secondary connection at DAVIS interlocking. Road trains traveling to Edgemoor continue north past Newark before leaving the NEC to access the Shellpot Secondary at RAGAN interlocking, just south of Wilmington. But for a local, NS operations typically do not occur on the stretch of track between RAGAN and BELL, which includes Wilmington station. North of BELL, the only scheduled NS traffic is unit trains and locals. At any time, NS may be ferrying local traffic or motive power across the NEC between the yards of Newark and Edgemoor, and there is also NS local work on the NEC in Delaware from Claymont all the way south to Elkton, Md, just over the state line.

The Shellpot Secondary is a 3 mile branch providing access to and from the south end of Edgemoor Yard for trains operating on Amtrak's NEC. The branch begins at RAGAN interlocking on the NEC and ends a few miles later as it crosses Bridge 3 moveable bridge and becomes the Shellpot Industrial Track entering Edgemoor Yard. Also at Bridge 3, the Shellpot connects to the New Castle Secondary via a wye formed by the New Connection Industrial Track. All NS freight trains using the NEC to enter or depart Edgemoor from the south use this branch to the connection at RAGAN. North of Edgemoor, NS trains access the NEC directly at BELL interlocking. Click here for a Timetable of the Shellpot.

The New Castle Secondary is a 14 mile branchline connecting the Shellpot Secondary and Shellpot Industrial Track (Edgemoor Yard) to the north with the Delmarva Secondary and Reybold Running Track to the south. The New Connection Industrial Track helps form a wye at the connection to the Shellpot. The New Castle serves as the NS connection to the busy Port of Wilmington terminal area and is rich with chemical traffic for online customers and for the terminal at Reybold which is accessed by a brief running track off of the New Castle near Porter. Unit trains and locals share this branch. Click here for a Timetable of the New Castle.

The Delmarva Secondary is Norfolk Southern's primary north-south route on the Delmarva Peninsula. Stretching from Newark, De, to Pocomoke, Md, the branch intersects the New Castle Secondary and Reybold Connecting Track at Porter, forming a northern Delaware rail triangle between the Delmarva, the New Castle/Shellpot and Amtrak's NEC. Road trains, locals and Amtrak share this brief 6-mile stretch of the branch between Newark and Porter. Click here for a Timetable of the Delmarva.

NS operations on the Amtrak NEC are conducted on 160.920 mhz (AAR 54). Other NS operations are conducted on radio frequencies 160.800 mhz (AAR 46), 161.070 mhz (AAR 64), 160.410 mhz (AAR 20), 160.860 mhz (AAR 50) and 160.980 mhz (58).

Road Trains

12G is the supply train for the Delmarva Peninsula, originating at Conway (Pittsburgh), Pa, and passing through the busy terminal of Enola (Harrisburg) before reaching Harrington. A crew is called out of Enola on Sunday-Friday evenings, typically between 1800 and 2359 to bring the train down the Port Road Branch from Enola to Perryville, Md, north on Amtrak's Northeast Corridor to Newark, De, and then south on the Delmarva Secondary to Harrington. Call time is highly dependent on when the inbound 12G and trains with connecting cars reach Enola, which dictate when the train is made up, inspected and ready to depart Enola. The only local work regularly performed by 12G is setting off cars for Dover, De, local H94 at Dover, and less frequently setting off stone at Felton, De. Due to congestion on the Port Road, Amtrak and the Delmarva, the train typically outlaws between Dover and Harrington and is relieved by a Harrington-based crew as required.

13G is the counterpart to 12G, originating at Harrington, De, and passing through Enola before reaching its terminus in Conway. A crew is called out of Harrington on Monday-Saturday evenings, typically between 1700 and 2200 to bring the train north up the Delmarva Secondary to Newark, De, south on Amtrak's Northeast Corridor to Perryville and west on the Port Road Branch to Enola. Since the same crew that brought 12G in during the morning is used to turn back on 13G at night, the train's call time is highly dependent on when 12G tied down during the morning and when the crew got to the hotel for rest. Like 12G, 13G can have local work at Felton, De, and typically makes a pickup at Dover, De, of cars from Dover local H94 that are ready to go back to other parts of the system.

18R is the carload supply train for NS' Reybold operations, originating at Conway, Pa, and, once in Enola, operating down the Port Road Branch to Perryville and then north on Amtrak's NEC before arriving in Delaware. Once in Delaware, the train usually terminates at Newark Yard along Amtrak's NEC but can also operate directly to Reybold and terminate there. As of September 2013, the train seems to be operating two or three nights a week carrying the carload traffic for Reybold that was formerly handled on 36A and set off at Newark, De. This train's schedule will be monitored for regularity in the coming months.

19R is the counterpart to 18R, originating at Newark, De, and operating south on Amtrak's NEC before heading west on the Port Road Branch at Perryville and continuing to Enola and Conway. As of September 2013, the train seems to be operating two or three nights a week carrying the carload traffic from Reybold that was formerly handled on 37A and picked up at Newark, De. The train may also orginate at Reybold. This train's schedule will be monitored for regularity in the coming months.

36A is the supply train for NS' northern Delaware operations, originating at Enola, Pa, and operating down the Port Road Branch to Perryville, north on Amtrak's NEC to Wilmington (RAGAN interlocking) and then north on the Shellpot Secondary before terminating at Edgemoor yard. The train operates seven days a week and is typically called out of Enola between 1800 and 0200. Call time is highly dependent on when train 36A and other trains with connecting cars reach Enola, which dictate when the train is made up, inspected and ready to depart Enola.

37A is the counterpart to 36A, originating at Edgemoor and running south on the Shellpot Secondary and Amtrak's NEC before heading west on the Port Road Branch at Perryville and terminating at Enola. A crew is called out of Edgemoor each evening, typically between 2000 and 2359. Since the same crew that brought 36A in during the morning is used to turn back on 37A at night, the train's call time is highly dependent on when 36A tied down during the morning and when the crew got to the hotel for rest.

64R is an as-needed unit crude oil train that originates in North Dakota and, once in Enola, operates down the Port Road Branch to Perryville and then north on Amtrak's NEC before arriving in Delaware. Once in Delaware, the train will enter the Delmarva Secondary at Newark (DAVIS interlocking) and operate south to Porter where it will cross the New Castle Secondary on a diamond and enter the Reybold Running Track to access the train's destination of PBF Energy in Reybold (Delaware City), De. The trains are usually powered by two or three NS six axle locomotives and are about 100 cars in length. The trains may also have distributed power (DPU) on the rear of the train.

65R is an as-needed empty unit crude oil train that is the counterpart to 64R. The train originates at PBF Energy in Reybold and operates off of the Reybold Running Track at Porter, cross the New Castle Secondary on a diamond and then operate north on the Delmarva Secondary to connect to Amtrak's Northeast Corridor at Newark (DAVIS interlocking), then south on Amtrak's NEC before heading west on the Port Road Branch at Perryville and continuing to North Dakota. These trains are made up of solid blocks of empty oil cars that arrived on a 64R and were unloaded on the loop tracks at PBF Energy in Reybold. The trains are usually powered by two or three NS six axle locomotives and are about 100 cars in length. The trains may also have distributed power (DPU) on the rear of the train.

64X is an as-needed unit crude oil train that originates in Conway, Pennsylvania, with crude oil cars that arrived at Conway in smaller non-unit train blocks from various points of origin in the Dakotas and Canada. From Enola, the train operates down the Port Road Branch to Perryville and then north on Amtrak's NEC before arriving in Delaware. Once in Delaware, the train will typically enter the Delmarva Secondary at Newark (DAVIS interlocking) and operate south to Porter where it will cross the New Castle Secondary on a diamond and enter the Reybold Running Track to access the train's destination of PBF Energy in Reybold (Delaware City), De., where they may be spotted on the loops for unloading or be put away in the yard at Reybold. The trains are usually powered by two or three NS six axle locomotives and are about 100 cars in length.

65X and 11G are as-needed empty unit crude oil train that is the counterpart to 64X and originates at PBF Energy in Reybold and operate off of the Reybold Running Track at Porter, cross the New Castle Secondary on a diamond and then operate north on the Delmarva Secondary to connect to Amtrak's Northeast Corridor at Newark (DAVIS interlocking), then south on Amtrak's NEC before heading west on the Port Road Branch at Perryville and continuing to North Dakota. These trains are made up of solid blocks of empty oil cars that arrived on a 64X and were unloaded at PBF Energy in Reybold. The trains are usually powered by two or three NS six axle locomotives and are about 100 cars in length.

62W is a seasonal stone train that originates at H&K's Birdsboro Materials in Birdsboro, Pa, and passes through the terminals of Abrams, Edgemoor and Harrington before arriving at its destination of H&K's Dagsboro Materials in Millsboro, De. The train is usually powered by two or three NS six axle locomotives and varies between 60 and 80 cars in length that are an eclectic mix of second-hand stone cars typically adorned with HKGX reporting marks. During the stone shipping season, which can be most of the year depending on the intensity of winter for a particular year, 62W usually makes two trips per week to Millsboro, utilizing NS' Harrisburg Line to Philadelphia, Amtrak's Northeast Corridor to Edgemoor, the New Castle Secondary to Porter, the Delmarva Secondary to Harrington and the Indian River Secondary to Millsboro. The train's final leg of the journey is most often called out of Edgemoor between 2000 and 0200, though the call time varies based on the inbound train's arrival from Abrams and various other factors. Once the train is put away at H&K's Millsboro facility, an industry switcher is used to unload the cuts of cars until the entire train is empty, typically 12 to 16 hours after arrival.

63W is the empty seasonal stone train that originates at H&K's Dagsboro Materials in Millsboro, De, and passes through the terminals of Harrington, Edgemoor and Abrams before arriving at its destination of H&K's Birdsboro Materials in Birdsboro, Pa. The train utilizes the power and cars off of 62W and generally returns empty tracing 62Ws routing twice per week during the stone shipping season. The train's call time is dependent on when 62W arrived at Millsboro and when the stone cars are finished being unloaded. Due to weather and other circumstances, 63W does not always return empty the evening following the morning of 62W's arrival.

568 and 852 are a couple of the loaded coal trains that operate on the Delmarva Peninsula to NRG's Indian River Generating Station. The trains typically feature two NS six axle road units and 105 loaded coal cars of NS or private ownership, and Indian River currently receives 50 to 60 of these trains per year. The trains originate from coal mines in the Monongahela coal fields of Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the West Virginia coal fields of Bluefield and even as far away as Wyoming's Powder RIver Basin. Though these are the current symbols being used for the trains, they change wildy and often. Once arrived at Enola from their points of origin, the trains are called out of Enola any night of the week between 1800 and 2359 and travel the Port Road Branch to Perryville, Md, Amtrak's Northeast Corridor north to Newark, De, the Delmarva Secondary south to Harrington and the Indian River Secondary to the generating station. Since they are usually following 12G on its days of operation and are busy passing other trains en route, they rarely make it to Indian River without being recrewed somewhere between Clayton and Houston on their routing. The empty counterparts to the loaded trains operate once the loaded train has been dumped or another set of hoppers from a previous loaded train is ready to go at Indian River. Their symbols also vary frequently and wildy, and though 567 and 897 continue to be used, other symbols in the 800-series may be used as well. The empty trains are usually called between 2000 and 2359 at Harrington, and the crew must taxi down and make up their train before heading west for Enola.

Grain trains are the final form of road train to the Delmarva Peninsula. These monsters have three NS six axle road units and 75 loaded corn cars that are enroute to Allen Foods in Cannon, De, or Amick Farms in Delmar, De. Their symbols vary wildly but are typically even numbers in the 400 or 500 series and are alphanumeric composed of two numbers and 1 letter, such as 42R, 46A or 50K. These trains originate from loading points in Ohio, Michigan and other midwestern grain states. Once arrived at Enola, Pa, the trains are typically called out between 1800 and 2200 and travel south down the Port Road Branch to Perryville, north on Amtrak's Northeast Corridor to Newark, De, and south on the Delmarva Secondary to Harrington where they are forwarded to Cannon or Delmar by a local crew. The trains are also often combined with 12G, though the combined train tends to keep the grain train symbol. Once emptied, which occurs 24 to 36 hours after being placed at the feed mills for unloading, the locomotives and cars return to Harrington where they are most often sent out as part of 13G, though sporadically are called as a separate train with an odd-number alphanumeric symbol such as 51K or 51R.

Local Freights

K62, K58 and K44 are NS' Edgemoor yard jobs. The K62 works daily in the morning hours while the K58 works daily in the afternoon hours, starting at 1500. Though the jobs are daily, they are covered by relief crew K52 on certain days of the week, so the K52 symbol may be used in their placed on those days. The K44 is the evening yard job, on duty at 2000. All of the jobs can be employed in any type of duty switching cars and making up trains around Edgemoor, the Northeast Corridor and the Port of Wilmington.

K56 is the local for DuPont in Edgemoor, which is just north of the yard along Amtrak's Northeast Corridor. This job is based in Edgemoor and works M-F, on duty before the K62 and spending its day within Edgemoor yard and the DuPont complex.

K53 is the Edgemoor based New Castle Secondary switcher, on duty M-F at 0800. Once the local's train is made up it will cross Bridge 3 and begin its journey down the New Castle Secondary, working Croda at Atlas Point, Printpack and a lumber receiver at New Castle and continuing on to Porter where it can also work Rocla Concrete Tie before turning back to Edgemoor.

K60 is the Edgemoor based local that works the Port of Wilmington and surrounding trackage, on duty M-F in the mid morning hours. This train will use Bridge 3 to access the New Castle Secondary and the Port of Wilmington, spending its day working within the confines of the Port and the industries surrounding the Port area.

K55 is the daylight Edgemoor based Port of Wilmington auto ramp switcher, on duty M-F at 1100. This job typically sets inbound autoracks and pulls the empties from the Honda auto ramp just southwest of the Port of Wilmington on the New Castle Secondary, crossing Bridge 3 to access the Port from Edgemoor yard. Once the loads are spotted and the empties are gathered, the local will often take the empties to Newark yard, traveling south on the Shellpot Secondary and Amtrak Northeast Corridor to access Newark, where the empties are left for pickup. The train commonly returns to Edgemoor lite after this move.

K52 is an Edgemoor based relief job that works yard assignments on the normal crew's rest days and has one additional day where they perform other work. On Saturday and Sunday the K52 works the K62's assignments. On Monday and Tuesday they work the K58's assignments. On Wednesdays the K52 will typically work as a separate job and perform work at the CSX interchange, known as "the B&O" at West yard adjacent to the Northeast Corridor just south of Wilmington station. These assignments can vary.

K35 and K54 are Newark based local jobs that switch out carload traffic for the PBF Energy refinery in Reybold and then travel to the refinery to work PBF, the Formosa plant at Delaware City and sometimes Rolca Concrete Tie at Porter. The K35 is on duty M-F and K54 works Weds-Sun. Supplmenting these two jobs is the K51 out of Edgemoor. Collectively, the locals keep traffic flowing to and from the refinery and Newark, as well as Edgemoor (as needed), yards.

K37 is NS' Edgemoor based local that works the industries along the Amtrak Northeast Corridor between Harmony and Newark, De. The job works Sun-Thurs at 2000, will operate south out of Edgemoor across Bridge 3 and enter the NEC at RAGAN interlocking, heading to switch FMC and Liquid Container on the NEC in Newark as well as any additional work in Harmony or Stanton.

H4V and H5V are extra crews called out of Harrington any day or the week at any time and used for any relief or extra train purposes needed. Common uses for the symbols is an extra weekend yard job or to relieve 12G or a coal/grain/stone train, even as far north as Newark.

Amtrak KP701 is the shop supply train for Amtrak's Bear Shops, which is located off of the Delmarva Secondary at Porter adjacent to NS Del Pro Yard. The train originates at Wilmington on the Amtrak Northeast Corridor and operates south on the NEC in push-pull mode to DAVIS interlocking where it reverses and travels southward for approximately six miles on the Delmarva Secondary before reaching its destination. The train follows the reverse routing on its return trip and generally appears three to five days per week in the mid to late morning, returning in the afternoon. Traffic handled by the job can include locomotives, passenger cars, baggage and concrete tie cars.

900 series Norfolk Southern trains are one of a few things. Most of those traveling to the Delmarva will be work trains, operating with symbols such as 920 or 934. These work trains can range from ballast trains to equipment movements and most often occur between December and April when NS tends to perform their trackwork on Delmarva. 904 is the NS symbol for the Track Geometry train, which visits Delmarva once every 12 to 18 months. 951 and 955 are the symbols for the NS Office Car train.

Info current as of June 2014

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